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discusses the use of mrs. nixon's recently-released private documents. this is just over 50 minutes. >> um, welcome to the richard nixon presidential library and museum. my name is paul wormser, and i'm the acting director of the librariment i appreciate all of you coming to one of our continuing author talk presentations. today we are very fortunate to have really the leading scholar on pat nixon who is, by the way, born 100 year ago this year. mary brennan, who did much of her research here for her book, is the chair of the department of history at the yawfort of texas in -- university of texas in san marcos. the -- excuse me. her specialty is post-world war ii conservative movements, and she has written b to date three different books, those being "turning right at the '60s: the conservative capture of the gop," "wives, mothers and the red menace," and, of course, the book that we love most around here, which is "pat nixon: embattled first lady." her book is an outstanding work, and i look forward to -- or or i would like you to help me welcome her out onto the stage to talk about her w
already and these congress people are not as stupid as you think, although mr. nixon did once say that most congressmen are not fit to be dog catchers, but-- dog catchers pretty sad job. >> it's not as easy as you think or else it would have been done and also the-- >> i disagree, ben, because it is easy, but, obviously, each party clings to its more dog mattic starts and making it impossible to be rational. >> it's simple, but not easy. the tragic part of this is even with the savings, the deficit and accumulative federal debt-- instead of an act of heroism such as never has been seen on capitol hill before. >> neil: that part you're right. adam. >> i would state this differently. the cbo is playing math games, that's fine. cut 1%, this is what you get. what they're not playing is political games. i completely disagree with what charles said. these people are inherently as a group corrupt. i don't think that's fair. if you want to say they're not doing their jobs well, not making the tough political decisions, that's different from correct. and dagen hit the nail on the head. we
legalization is just a matter of time. >>> a week long commemoration of richard nixon started today. mr.nixon was born 100 years ago next wednesday. he is the only u.s. president ever to resign from office in the midst of the water gate scandal. speakers today concentrated on his abilities. >> he was a president who's impact on the world strategic landscape and our own armed forces is historical in context. >> fighter jets flew over head as part of today's ceremony and his oldest daughter patricia planted a wreath sent by president obama. >>> the hot button issue taking center stage tomorrow in a north bay courtroom. how one man is attempting to make a statement in traffic court. >> and also, a reminder that you can get ktvu news to go right on your cell phone. just download the ktvu app, click the live icon and watch all of our newscasts live. [ woman ] ring. ring. progresso. your new light creamy potato with bacon & cheese soup says it's 100 calories a serving. that's right. in what world do potatoes, bacon and cheese add up to 100 calories? your world. my world. ♪ [ whispers ] real bacon
nixon's 100 birthday from this comfortable distance, mr. nixon can also be remembered as a president who had a profoundly liberal record of legislative accomplishment. these were not necessarily nixon's own ideas. he was actually a conservative. so most of these things were democratic ideas from the congress. but governing went coming to governing agreement with the congress, including with the democrats in congress. so when you look at the record of what nixon signed into law, it really is president nixon who we have to thank for the environmental protection agency and the national oceanic and atmospheric administration and osha and the consumer product safety commission and title ix and the cost of living adjustments to social security. those first three things on the list creating the epa, creating noaa, creating osha, that was all just in one year that was all in 1970. on the occasion of renewed interest in richard nixon for his 100th birthday, there is kind of an urban legend going on about him right now. this is supposed to show how his signature deteriorated over time. so in 1968,
's give them hell campaign winds that mr. nixon played to rough. in the taft eisenhower battle of 1952 and internationalist, the boss with the vice presidential nominee and a man of destiny. then it was the establishment first moved to bring him down. they hyped a phony story about a political fund alleged it was for senator nixon's personal benefit and instigated a great human cry for general eisenhower to drop him from the ticket. senator nixon's decision to defend his record and integrity in the checkers speech, though mocked by his enemies, remains the most brilliant use of television by a political figure and the 20th century. [applause] in the 1950's he redefined the vice presidency as a force of foreign-policy, braved a lynch mob in caracas and became the first vice president to travel behind the iron curtain. he confronted khrushchev's bluster in the kitchen debate. by 1960 had no serious challenger for the nomination. and after the closest election in history, about which there hung the aroma of vote fraud in texas and illinois, he went to missouri. he went home to california
that we wrote based on what we thought may have happened with mrs. nixon and mr. nixon. and accountant members. cabinet members. lincoln, they go behind doors, it's about a man played by an actor. and with mr. bush, we don't know what the relationship is, we sense our way through it. that's the best we can do. it's an historical drama. when i can "untold history of the united states" i'm saying these are the facts as we researched. >> why have you been drawn to these actually history? >> it's the drama. it's the basis of power. and in these men who are -- and women who, you know, run things, who do things, you know, the greeks loved it. and they're akt trattracted to . i always felt that lincoln was a very ugly man. my father respected him at the time. underneath that authority figure, i found my truth -- >> i liked nixon. >> when i heard it's true that he ended up on his knees praying with kissinger which is a great parable which is probably what did happen, it's a great moment. >> the untold history that we're going to talk about more with your co-author, a lot of it is about mytholo
commemoration of richard nixon started today. mr.nixon was born 100 years ago next wednesday. he is the only u.s. president ever to resign from office in the midst of the water gate scandal. speakers today concentrated on his abilities. >> he was a president who's impact on the world strategic landscape and our own armed forces is historical in context. >> fighter jets flew over head as part of today's ceremony and his oldest daughter patricia planted a wreath sent by president obama. >>> the hot button issue taking center stage tomorrow in a north bay courtroom. how one man is attempting to make a statement in traffic court. >> and also, a reminder that you can get ktvu news to go right on your cell phone. [ male announcer ] the career landscape of america is changing. new jobs are here, and by 2025, we could have millions more that demand qualified college graduates. many in the bay area. at devry university, our market-responsive bachelor's and master's degree programs can give you what you need to succeed in today's careers and the ones on the horizon. get the know how you need for a new t
rights, epa healthcare act that even ted kennedy said his biggest regret he didn't embrace nixon's health plan. they have gone so far to the right. >> john: but he hated blacks and jews, rest in piece mr. nixon. dean and scott, and the lee three of my favorite new york politico medians. thank you so much for joining us. up next, happier news, same sex weddings guess who is flipping out. that's up ahead. hd
waiting all day to hear from mr. garland nixon about what she has done for any tangible effort at peace whatsoever. >> garland, let us know? what do you think? >> a couple of things. first of all with former president clinton, if you look at the clinton foundation, they have donated upwards of $30 million to haiti since the earthquake. they have been responsible for literally millions of people getting -- in africa getting medication for h.i.v. and aids. it's hard to question the clinton foundation and what they have done. >> what about hillary? secretary clinton i should say. >> one of the important things she has done is taken the state department in a fundamentally different direction. she has recognized how important it is for development to be part of the policy. so preemptively, she is addressing issues such as hunger, as opposed to just waiting for things to flare up. she has recognized how important it is when people are hungry and not doing well, you have a greater propensity for uprisings and for instability. >> yeah. that's a really break through. >> we have to bring this up.
country is all about. >> mr. eisenhower and mr. nixon, are present at the conclusion of to one of the best transitions of power on record. >> the moment is sort of a secular religious moment because we are giving this power and transferring democratic power to a new leader. the ceremony itself is a real tribute to the country that a person who was the president, can go out and become a private citizen and a new private citizen is becoming the president. it's peaceful. and that's an extraordinary thing in the history of our world. twins. i didn't see them coming. i have obligations. cute obligations, but obligations. i need to rethink the core of my portfolio. what i really need is sleep. introducing the ishares core, building blocks for the heart of your portfolio. find out why 9 out of 10 large professional investors choose ishares for their etfs. ishares by blackrock. call 1-800-ishares for a prospectus which includes investment objectives, risks, charges and expenses. read and consider it carefully before investing. risk includes possible loss of principal. go, go, go, go! bye sweetie.
introverts tend to be such strong to politics. i offer richard nixon. mr gregarious. as an example. i think our incumbent president, i have a slight possibility might be having more fun when he is watching george w. bush's sports package by himself in the treaty room than talking to members of congress. just a guess but he has got to move beyond that. if you look back to find ways to move forward, you have to bring people together. not that they're going to agree with you and not that all of a sudden ball all law is going to descend, but you tend to give someone the benefit of the doubt if you sit down, if you had a meal together, you get the little harder to be totally cross. is not impossible but it gets a little harder. almost every night when congress is in session thomas jefferson had lawmakers to dinner. he did not have republicans and federalists so we could all sit around like simpson-bowles and issue a report. that wasn't what he was doing. he didn't want them fighting with each other so what he did was he both attachments to himself because he believed he was the center of action
of a sumptuous buffet. a sneak review of the food. -- preview of the food. the president and mrs. eisenhower ate a hearty meal. the vice president and his wife, followed by the nixon's two children. even the solemn ceremony could not dispel the humor of her black eye. what are little girls made of? sam, joe martin and mark. the chief justice and his wife. former president hoover. senator and mrs. bridges, along with members of the joint inaugural committee and their wives were host to the party. ♪ as the president and his wife waved to the cheering multitudes, they start the drive to the reviewing stand in front of the white house. down pennsylvania avenue, the inaugural parade is led by a platoon of washington metropolitan motorcycle police. the president, in an open car, waves to them all, the thousands who lined the parade route. as the parade approached the treasury building, they turn up 15th street. the president and maney -- mamie are followed by the vice president and pat nixon. >> now john f. kennedy's 1961 and not duration as the country 's 35th president. the day before us to be swo
king was jailed back in '60 and kennedy made the call to mrs. king and nixon said i'm not going to do it, and jackie robinson left the trade saying this guy doesn't get it. >> this is a moment that we're going to remember, i think, and the republican party really should pay attention. it really should. >> we're making the noise here. we're trying to shake them up. thank you, gene robinson and alex wagner. >>> president obama warns republicans they won't get ransom for agreeing not to crash the economy. he's talking tough ahead of the next big fight with congress over the debt ceiling. >>> the president said vice president biden has presented him with a list of common sense steps to prevent gun violence. but the biggest question is how much of it the administration can actually get passed through the congress. >>> and watching last night's golden globes, one thing was clear to me, america once again feels good about itself. we've got a new sense of optimism, and the movies show it. >>> the latest attack on science by a republican member of the house science committee. what a strange na
president and his wife with mrs. john eisenhower, with the nixon's children. even a solemn ceremony could not dispel the tumor -- humor of black eyes. and chief justice earl warren. and mrs. warren. former president hoover. a senator and his wife, along with members of the joint inaugural committee. as the president and his wife leave, they go to the reviewing stand in front of the white house. down pennsylvania avenue, the inaugural parade is led by a platoon of washington d.c. motorcycle police. the president, in an open car, waving to them all, the thousands who lined the parade route. as the parade approaches the treasury building, they turn up a street. the president and his wife are followed by the vice president and pat nixon. >> harry truman was inaugurated as the 33rd president. he had already served as president since 1945. as vice presidents, he took office after the death of fdr. this was televised live to the nation. it is coverage of the event from universal newsreels. this is about 20 minutes. >> inauguration day, washington, 1949. the biggest inaugural in united states his
. -- truman, very conservative. nixon, he played it straight. kennedy is spectacular. >> what reagan? the first one? >> mr. showbiz. that was the best parade ever. >> expects president obama to field a people's parade. >> president obama feels strongly about the people and especially the young people. you can imagine when they're in the presidential inaugural parade he will remember -- they will remember that the rest of their life. >> and when that happens charlie will make the call. >> is history in the making and i am happy to have my little toe in there. >> giving a voice to history as it happens. >> a fascinating guy and an interesting note. he described the carter inaugural parade as average at best but he also pointed out president carter started the tradition of president walking in the parade and remains the only president who walked the entire parade route. >> >> officially a trace of precipitation. the radar has been loaded up but it is south of us. we ended up with a trace. storms should slide off the coast overnight. we have been above freezing all day. 45 for the high.
envisioned a gay when a guy like richard nixon would be elected president. now for the top story tonight. more fallout from the al gore al jazeera situation as you may know. mr. gore has made tens of millions of dollars by selling his failing far left cable network to the anti-americans who run al jazeera out of the persian gulf. some of the people currently working at current tv are said to be angry because they will lose their jobs while mr. gore enriches himself. as far as al jazeera is concerned, all you need to know is this. in 2008, that network threw a televised birthday party for a lebanese terrorist. there he is in 1979 he was imprisoned for shooting israeli civilian dead in front of his 4-year-old daughter. then murdering the little girl by bashing her head in with a rifle. he got out of prison for some reason and al jazeera threw him a big party. tell vifsed it. i'm not sure whether al gore was invited. i'm with us now fox news anchor geraldo rivera who has his own al gore story. you know this terrorist as well. you talked to him. >> i do. i interviewed him in prison a year af
. >> richard nixon or eisenhower which either side of the line. >> more interesting conversation but my clock is ticking. mr. clemmons, always a pleasure. thanks for coming in. interesting couple of days when the hearing begins on thursday. >>> developing now, you're looking at live pictures of secretary of state hillary clinton holding a town hall as we told you right now where clinton is winding down at the state department. her supporters are gearing up for a potential 2016 run. speaking of developments, another member of the preside president's cabinet is making it official. ray loo hood is telling the associated press he does plan to leave the obama administration and sooner rather than later. first, white house soup of the day, i could use this is today. minestrone chicken sausage. sounds like a good brothy soup. always good when you're still recovering from this voice issue i have. we'll be right back. you turn for legal matters? maybe you want to incorporate a business. or protect your family with a will or living trust. and you'd like the help of an attorney. at legalzoom a legal pla
man, mr. butterfield? >> one of the things that we do not -- those of us outside of the white house -- we do not really know how it works. to have the people who were with richard nixon describe the day is priceless. we had the tapes, but we do not know what is going on around the tapes. it was not just butterfield -- you have colson, glen garmond, folks talking about what it was like. that is priceless. that is the part of history that gives it context and meaning but then disappears. it is often not written down. one of the byproducts of these interviews -- i let the tape run. i let people, even if it was somewhat rambling, let people think and recall and speak. what you get out of it is color -- it is preserved forever. one of the things that was very important to me is i had experienced oral history -- out of the miller center at the university of virginia. james young was conducting a program there and i was one of the interviewers. the way it was run by the miller center -- it was not their fault, just the deal they had struck -- the private foundation took control over the in
simon the former secretary of treasury i believe under the ford or reagan. >> host: nixon. >> guest: i'm not sure. >> host: did you meet mr. olive. >> guest: no. >> host: what did they expect to you do? do so you have a person of view to get the professorship? >> guest: i probably had too have a certain point of view. what they did what the they told me is the olin -- he was in charge of the foundation, he said the olin foundation they won't give george mason $2 or $3 million for the endowment to let you live off the income. he said if we do that you might die or move and they'll hire a marxist in your place and we don't anything. he said with a we do to keep the endowment at the old foundation and send you the income each year to the 51c3 basedded at dporg mason university. and he said all we want from you is an address. one of my friends, i was explaining describing my charity to one of colleagues. e said it's a wheelchair. it goes whenever you go. so i guess i was a free market person a free market economist and they were satisfied with that. >> that foundation, gave washington some
. [applause] >> vice president johnson, mr. speaker, mr. chief justice, president eisenhower, vice president nixon, president truman, reverend clergy, fellow citizens, we observe today not a victory of party, but a celebration of freedom -- symbolizing an end as well as a beginning -- signifying renewal as well as change. for i have sworn before you and almighty god the same solemn oath our forebears prescribed nearly a century and three- quarters ago. the world is very different now. for man holds in his mortal hands the power to abolish all forms of human poverty and all forms of human life. and yet the same revolutionary beliefs for which our forebears fought are still at issue around the globe -- the belief that the rights of man come not from the generosity of the state, but from the hand of god. we dare not forget today that we are the heirs of that first revolution. let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe alike, that the torch has been passed to a new generation of americans -- born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace, pro
until he went to the residence. >> what are you thinking as you watch the former military man mr. butterfield. >> one of the things we don't -- those of us outside of a white house, we don't really know how it works. and to have the people who were with richard nixon describe the day is priceless. we have the tapes, of course, but we don't know what's going on around the taped areas. and it wasn't just butterfield, you've got collison and lynn garmand in and out of the white house and people talking about what it was like. that's priceless. that's the part of history that gives it context and meaning but that disappears because it's often not written down. one of the byproducts of these interviews, because i let the tape run. i didn't interrupt. i let people -- even if it was somewhat rambled, i let people think and recall and speak. what you get out of it is color. and it's preserved forever. one of the things that i -- was very important to me, because i had experience in doing oral history. i was at the miller center of public affairs at the university of virginia and james st
. no special parade. ne nixon, he plays it straight. kennedy is spectacular. >> what about reagan the first one? >> mr. show biz. that was the best parade ever. >> he expects president obama to once again field a people's parade. >> president obama feels strongly about the people. especially the young people. when they are at a presidential inaugural parade they will remember that for the rest of their lives. >> when it happens charlie brat man will make the call. >> it's history in the making. i am happy to have my little toe in there. >> giving a voice to history as it happens. in tacoma park i am kate omara. >> quite an honor. >> what a character, too. >> new restaurants ahead a look for a new entertainment center. >> go ravens! >> these are some of the youngest and cutest raven fans around. what they are to go to get excited for the plan. >> we will show you what happened to a young girl who's dream was to there is no mass-produced human. every human being is unique. and there is one store that recognizes it. the sleep number store. the only place in the world you'll find... the extraordina
of the senate. where you're sitting today, mr. president, the vice president, sitting in that cha chair, they have ruled on the meaning of article 1, section 5. in 1957, vice president nixon ruled that -- quote -- "the right of the current majority of the senate at the beginning of a new congress to adopt its own rules, standing as it does from the constitution itself, cannot be restricted or limited by rules adopted by a majority of previous congress -- of a previous congress." vice presidents rockefeller, vice president humphrey made simple rulings at the beginning of later congresses. the constitution is clear and there is also a long-standing common law principle upheld in the supreme court, that one legislature cannot bind its successors. many of my republican colleagues have made the same argument. for example, in 2003, senator john cornyn wrote in a law review article, "just as one congress cannot enact a law that a subsequent congress could not amend by a majority vote, one senate cannot enact a rule that a subsequent senate could not amend by majority vote. such power, after al
kerry's seat. mr. frank is 72 years old and served 16 terms in the u.s. house. when he retired he was chairman of house financial services committee. >> the big discussion that i remember was, what is richard nixon going to do. >> i remember going home that night scared to death. this is like a time bomb. this thing gets out and gets in the press and anderson gets it's going it is a disaster for all of us. >> john came to me, john dean the president's council brought me a list of i think 50 names of people. wants a full field investigation of them. that is a very unpleasant thing have happen to you. >> shortly after the farewell speech, al hague, chief of staff called me. i can't exactly what he said. david, we forgot one thing. he said, what's that? we forgot a resignation letter. i said that is very interesting to, i think will be interested to read it. you need to write it. >> i thought the best way not for me as historian, i'm a trained historian though i wasn't a nixon specialist, for the players, key people living from that era to tell the story themselves. so i thought the
plan. they have gone so far to the right. >> john: but he hated blacks and jews rest in piece mr. nixon. dean and scott, and the lee three of my favorite new york politico medians. thank you so much for joining us. up next, happier news, same sex weddings, guess who is flipping out. that's up ahead. >> john: tonight's commentary, church is so gay. specifically the cathedral church of st. peter and st. paul known as the national cathedral in washington, d.c. the beautiful neo-gothic house of worship is the sixth largest cathedral on earth. teddy roosevelt was there when they began building it in 1907, and george wh bush was there in 1980. congress has dedicated the cathedral as the house of prayer and helen keller is buried on the ground. but today the cathedral made history when they announceed they'll host same sex weddings. now predictably many of our right wing blogger friend are acting like dc didn't make same-sex marriage legal but mandatory. imagine they can marry who they want has outraged tons of homophobic followers of non- non-homophobe jesus. that's onlythat's fitting that th
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)

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